Working towards greater community control over land, forests and natural resources

Posts Tagged ‘Myanmar’

Regional experts mull solutions to land governance challenges

Vientiane Times 24th February 2016

Experts are seeking to design innovative solutions to land-related challenges in Laos, Cambodia, Myanmar and Vietnam by discussing the experiences of the four Mekong countries. More than 80 people representing over 30 organisations from six countries in South East Asia are taking part in a regional stakeholders’ consultation workshop in Vientiane from February 23-24. The meeting is considering coordinated responses and priority areas for joint collaboration on issues of land governance.

ASEAN Chief Justices Taking Action on Environmental Law and Enforcement

ADB 16 December 2014MANILA, PHILIPPINES – Justices from the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) have agreed to measures to strengthen environmental law adjudication and enforcement in the region. During the Fourth ASEAN Chief Justices’ Roundtable on Environment, held in Hanoi, Viet Nam from 12-14 December, justices from Indonesia, Myanmar, Thailand, and Viet Nam indicated they had established national judicial working groups on environmental law, while most agreed to develop national environmental law bench books for use in courts and tribunals.

“As champions of the rule of law, ASEAN judiciaries’ have a unique and critical role in tackling the region’s key environmental challenges such as the illegal forestry and illegal wildlife trades,” said Kala Mulqueeny, Principal Counsel, in ADB’s Office of General Counsel. “What is exciting is how seriously these judiciaries are taking this role, while also calling for improvements at the police and prosecution levels.”

Expert cautions on ‘land grab’ model

Myanmar Times, February 27, 2012

A visiting land expert has warned against falling for the “dominant model” of land grabbing, which sees small-scale farmers replaced by agri-businesses that are in many cases less productive. Mr Robin Palmer, who has worked on land issues for more than 35 years as both an academic and for British NGO Oxfam, said last week that population pressures and the increasing consumption of meat and dairy products in developing countries were often used to justify plantation farming, with peasant farmers and traditional pastoralists dismissed as “romantic nonsense”.

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